How to set up and use WinZip

(Including pkzip)

1. Download the version of Winzip for your platform (Windows 95 or Windows 3.1) off SpoCom's Download Software Page. Also, while you're there, download the program "PKZIP" (the file is pk204g.exe). Place them both in a directory where you can find them later like c:\dump or c:\temp (later, you'll set up the program from that directory).

2. Open "File Manager" in Windows 3.1 (should be in the "Main" program group) or Windows Explorer in Windows 95 (Start -- Programs -- Windows Explorer). Highlight the c:\ folder at the top of the left-hand window (Windows 3.1), or the Dos-(C:) folder in Windows 95). Select "File" from the menu bar, then "Create Directory". Name the directory pkzip, or zippers, or whatever you'd like -- it is where you will eventually put the pkzip program, so it should be appropriate to that program.

3. Find the file pk204g.exe by highlighting the directory where you downloaded it in the left window, then drag it into the directory you created in step number 2 (pkzip, or zippers, etc...this will move the file into the new directory). Windows 95 users will only create a shortcut if they try to drag and drop the file. Windows95 user will have to highlight the file in the right window, then select "Edit" from the menu bar, then cut (or control-x to cut, or control-c to copy), then highlight the directory in the left window that you created in step number 2 (pkzip, zippers, etc...), then selecting "Edit" again from the menu bar, then paste (or control-v). This will move the file into that directory.

4. Highlight the left directory where you just placed pk204g.exe and double click your mouse on the pk204g.exe file in the right side of the File Manager window. This will self-extract the program in DOS. Once extracted you may delete the file pk204g.exe, as you no longer need it, or you may leave it, just in case you ever want to pass it on or set it up again.

5. Exit File manager or Windows Explorer.

6. Windows 3.1 users select "File" from the menu bar, then "Run", then type in the directory where you placed the Winzip file followed by the name of the WinZip file you downloaded (for example: c:\temp\wz60wn16.exe), then hit ENTER -- this will start the Winzip setup program (you may also select "Browse" to find the file).

   --Windows 95 users select "Start", then "Run", then type in the name of the directory where you placed the WinZip 95 file followed by the name of the file (for example: c:\temp\winzip95.exe), then hit ENTER -- this will start the WinZip 95 setup program (you may also select "Browse" to find the file).

7. A Wizard will open up to setup the Winzip program. Select "Custom Setup" on the wizard and continue the setup. You may also select the directory where you want to place WinZip, or continue using the default settings.

8. If the program prompts you for the "Program Locations" (Windows 3.1), or a button appears labeled "Program Locations" (Windows 95), select it. In the top box labeled PKZIP type the directory where you place PKZIP followed by: \pkzip.exe (for example: c:\pkzip\pkzip.exe -- this tells the WinZip program where to find pkzip.exe to use it in the zipping process.

   -- In the second box labeled PKUNZIP type the directory where you place PKZIP followed by: \pkunzip.exe (for example: c:\pkzip\pkunzip.exe -- this tells the WinZip program where to find pkunzip.exe to use in the unzipping process.

   -- You need not fill in any of the other blank boxes -- just select the "Okay" button, then continue with the setup using the default settings.

9. A window will appear in the setup asking what you want to associate the program with. Leave the default settings and select "Okay" or "Next".

10. When setup is finished, the WinZip program window will appear ready to use zipping or unzipping your files. You may close it or use it, depending on your need at the time.

USING WINZIP TO UNZIP ZIPPED FILES

1. Open the WinZip program (Windows 3.1 open the Winzip program group and double click the Winzip program icon) -- (Windows 95 users select "Start", then "Programs", then the Winzip program group, then the Winzip program icon).

   NOTE: If you're familiar with your file manager, you may find your zipped file there and simply double-click on it, which will then automatically open WinZip and place the files in WinZip's progarm window for extraction (you could then skip instruction numbers 2 and 3 below). A zipped file will always have a ".zip" extension in Windows 3.1 and a "Winzip File" extension in Windows 95.

2. When the WinZip program window opens, select the "Open" button.

3. A browser window will appear where you can now browse to find the file you want to unzip. Windows 3.1 users select drive in the lower right-hand box (C is the default drive), the directory in the left window and the file in the right window. Windows 95 users select the drive in the top box (C is the default drive), then the directory in the main window, then the file in the main window. Select the "Open" button when you have the zipped file you want highlighted or double click on the file.

4. The main WinZip program window should now be filled with files -- the files that make up the program that was zipped into the single zip file.

5. You may select a single file to unzip or view by highlighting it then selecting the "Extract" or "View" button -- a handy tool for viewing "Readme" files before setting up a program -- or you may extract (unzip) the entire program into a directory of your choosing.

   NOTE: If you highlight any files then only that file or files will be extracted if you hit extract. If you do not highlight any files, all the files will be extracted when you hit the "Extract" button. If you plan to extract the entire group of files, don't highlight any of them, just go straight to the "Extract" button.

6. Select the "Extract" button. A window will appear similar to the "Open" window mentioned in step number 3, asking where you want to extract your files to. Select a directory by browsing or by typing it into the top left-hand box (for example: c:\temp).    NOTE: If the files in the WinZip program window include a "Setup" or "Install" file, I recommend extracting the program into a temp directory, then run setup from the temp directory. Once the program is setup, you no longer need the files that were used to set them up, so you may delete them. Likewise, once the zipped file is set up, you no longer need it and may delete it. If the WinZip program window shows no "Setup" or "Install" file you will need to set up your own icon for the program (see "Tricks" on the "SpoCom How to Pages" for a quick and easy way to set up icons in Windows 3.1, and how to set up icons in Windows 95), so you should unzip it into the directory where you want it to end up permanently.

7. Close the WinZip program (or select "Open" -- see step number 2 -- and unzip another zipped file) and run setup on the program you unzipped, or set up an icon for the program you unzipped (see "Tricks" on the "SpoCom How to Pages" for a quick and easy way to set up icons in Windows 3.1, and how to set up icons in Windows 95).

ZIPPING FILES ACROSS SEVERAL DISKS (SPANNING)

1. Create a small file with anything in it -- a small text file is perfect -- and zip it up. Windows 3.1 users select "Notepad" in the "Accessories" program group -- Windows 95 users select "Start", then "Programs", then "Accessorie", then "Notepad" or "Wordpad". Type something like; "this is a span disk sample file", then select "File" from the menu bar, then "Save-as" then save the file as something you will remember, such as "span.txt" in a directory you will remember, such as c:\dump.

2. Open the Winzip program (see step number 1 above in the "USING WINZIP TO UNZIP ZIPPED FILES" section). Select the "NEW" button in the Winzip window. Another window will open up asking you where you want to put the file you are about to zip up (place it in your "A" drive -- be sure a floppy disk is in that drive), and what you want to name your new zipped file (name it the name of the program or files you want to zip -- for example: dlfull21.zip, which is the name of the Windows 3.1 full installation of Internet Explorer -- notice that the extension you use is "zip" however). Select "Okay".

3. Another window will now appear asking you what files you want to put into your new zipped file and what options you want to use to zip files. In the lower left-hand window under "Action" select "Add (and replace) Files. Under the box labeled "Compression" you may select whatever you desire or leave it on the default. Under the box labeled "Multiple Disk Spanning" select the option you want to use to span disks (I recommend overwrite without formatting, since DOS or File manager will format disks much faster than the Winzip Program -- just make sure you use formatted disks to put your file on). Select the small text file that you created in step number 1 by browsing to the directory where you placed it. Once that file is highlighted, select "Add".

4. Winzip will now zip your small text file into a new file with a zip extension named whatever you named it above in step number 2. Now select the "Open" button in the Winzip Window, then select your "A" drive, then select the new zipped file you created. This will put the new file into your Winzip Window. Highlight it.

5. Select the "Add" button in the Winzip Window. A new window will open up asking you what files you want to add to the zipped file you created on the floppy in drive "A". Browse and select the file or files you want to add (for example: c:\temp\dlfull21.exe which is the full Internet Explorer setup for Windows 3.1). The size of the file doesn't matter, because Winzip will span it across disks (if you so desired, you could back up your entire "C" drive, as long as you have enough disks to span it across). Once you select the file or files you want to add, select the "Add" button.

6. Winzip will warn you that you are about to overwrite the file on your "A" drive with a new file or files. Select "Okay" -- you want to replace that little text file with the new file or files. Winzip will now kick you into DOS and prompt you when you need to change disks (be sure to label them correctly -- 1, 2, 3, etc...).

7. To unzip a zipped file that is spanned across several disks, you place the last disk in the series into your drive (that disk contains the catalogue for the rest of the disks), then follow the steps above for unzipping files with winzip (Open the file and Extract it). Again, Winzip will kick you into DOS and prompt you what disk to put in.

NOTE: You may select a single or several files out of a list of files zipped across several disks -- DOS will prompt you which disk or disks to put in to retrieve the particular files that you want.

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